Othello tutorial, p.4 – Playin’ on the edge!

In previous parts of this tutorial I’ve written about the basics of Othello’s strategy, quiet and loud moves and about starting the game. If you already know all this and you’ve played a dozen or tens games, you might have noticed one thing. The moves made at the edge of the board have a huge impact on victory or defeat. In the next lesson we will discuss the edge play.

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Gin Rummy – good introduction to rummies

If you like old American movies you could see people playing Gin Rummy. Why exactly this game? There are few reasons! First, this is a game for smart people. Secondly, this is a game with dramatic ending. Thirdly… Gin Rummy has unique taste of the risk mixed with a cool strategy.

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Camelot – you can charge in this game

Recently I wrote that chess and checkers are two very different games without common roots. Despite this, there were people who tried to merge this games and results were fascinating. One of those people was George Swinnerton Parker (1866-1952), who created a fantastic game of Camelot. This game is not popular today. What a pity! For me it’s an underestimated jewel of board games.

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Do you think Chess is harder than Checkers (Draughts)? Here’s why you’re wrong!

In my country (Poland) chess is called a “royal game” while the Checkers are known as “Chess of proletariat”. Such terms clearly classify first game as noble and worthwhile and the second as silly or worse. Many people think they sound like experts when they speak about the superiority of the Chess over the Checkers (Draughts). In fact, such people show only their ignorance. Chess is not harder than Checkers … and vice versa. In the case of non-trivial games you should generally avoid speaking about a superiority of one game over another.

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Malefiz for 6 players – barricade with funny turmoil

If you are looking for a relaxing but not to easy game to play with friends, malefiz is a great choice. Unfortunately, the basic variant of the game is for 4 players only. What to do if you gather a larger group – 5 or 6 people? No problem. There is a variant on a larger board!
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Diagonal draughts on larger board -International (Polish) Draughts, Soviet Checkers, Canadian Draughts, Frisian Draughts, Ghanaian Draughts, Malaysian Draughts

I wrote about 64-square  draughts variants and about three games from orthogonal draughts family. Every time I mentioned that “draughts” is not one game. It’s a group of games with some common features. So far I described only games played on a 64-square board, although with very different rules. Now it’s time to present games on larger boards with 80 squares (8×10), 100 squares (10×10) and even 144 squares (12×12).

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Dominoes – more than blocks for kids

I think everyone knows what domino is. Often we treat dominoes as blocks for children, a simple toy used to learning to count. Sometimes we play with kids because this game seems simple. In my country (Poland) it’s rather unusual to see adults playing dominoes. What a pity! This game is more addictive than you think, and besides, it has a fascinating history. You can play many games with one set of domino tiles, just like you can play many games with one deck of cards.

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